Pesach

Pesach, which falls on the 14th day of Nisan, celebrates our people's freedom from bondage under Pharaoh in the land of Mitzrayim, as recounted in the Book of Exodus (Shemot).  For seven days, we eat matzah and consume no leavened products, to remind us of our biblical forebears who fled before their bread could rise.  We also share a ritual meal, a Pesach seder, in which we retell the story of our exodus.  

Our synagogue is cleared of all leavened products during the days of Pesach, and we gather for a communal seder on the 2nd night of Pesach.  We also hold a Pesach morning festival service, a 7th day Yizkor service, and a beachside service for the 7th day at which we chant the Song at the Sea.

"In every generation," reads our Haggadah (order of service for the seder), "each person must see him or herself as having personally gone forth from Mitzrayim (Egypt)."  Each year, we are to remember that we were slaves and strangers in a strange land, so that we will each work to end oppression of all peoples, in every era.

 

pesach 2018 Services

Thursday 5 April - Erev Seventh day service - 6:30pm - Includes Yizkor

Friday 6 April - Seventh Day at the Beach  - 11:00am (See details below)

 

'Song of the sea' at the sea! (Seventh Day Pesach)

Friday 6 April 2018 - 11:00am

For the second year running, North Shore Temple Emanuel (NSTE) will be chanting the 'Song at the Sea' - at the sea!

On Friday 6 April (Seventh day of Pesach), the festival morning tefilah will take place at 11:00am at Fisherman’s Beach, Collaroy, rather than the Shule's premises in Chatswood. The service will be led by Rabbi Nicole Roberts and Cantor Ted Labow, and attendees are invited to enjoy a BYO kosher l’Pesach potluck picnic together afterwards. 

Traditionally chanted on the seventh day of Pesach, the Song at the Sea (Shirat HaYam) is found in the Book of Exodus (Shemot). Its words express the Israelites’ jubilant amazement and their gratitude to God for parting the waters, enabling them to cross the Sea of Reeds and escape servitude.

“At the beach, one really senses the majesty of God,” says Rabbi Roberts. “Last year, it occurred to us that Sydney offers such inspiring environs; why not celebrate the crossing of the Sea in a place that stirs our collective memory and imagination?’”  

The 2017 participants enjoyed a unique and moving experience, with one person describing the service “a resounding success.” 

“The picnic afterwards is a lovely, communal way to finish up those last remaining kosher l’Pesach snacks as well!” adds Rabbi Roberts.

We hope to see you there!